Review: Osprey Daylite Daypack

I love bags. Not purses. Like built-for-utility, well-designed bags. I mean, don’t get me wrong. A nice purse always catches my eye, but I always go for function over looks, first. And if you know me at all, I have an unhealthy number of bags in my possession. I put bags inside bags. To paint you a picture in your head, my day-to-day purse currently contains four bags right now. I blame my mom for that weird habit.

So, I thought it’d be fun to do reviews on some of the bags and backpacks I own. The ones worth reviewing anyway. None of these posts or bags are paid for (so far). I just love bags.

The first one I’ll talk about is my Osprey Daylite daypack. It’s actually the one I refer my friends to the most. Whenever they ask me about the best daypack, I rave about this guy. Is it the best one? I don’t know. I’m not a backpack tester and don’t have the monies to buy a million daypacks. But it’s the one I own and I can’t get over how functional it is. Note: I have the older version, so this is a review on that one.

You might have seen the red pack on my back in several of my photos on @jenkfood. It seriously goes on every hike with me. The stories it can tell and the sweat it has endured. Why is it red? Honestly, it’s not even my favorite color. It was the one on sale and I didn’t want the purple one. But it’s now become a part of my hiking get-up and sets the palette for the rest of my gear, kind of. Luckily green is a complementary color and I really like the color green.

THE SPECIFICS

A few things I like about the daypack is that it’s lightweight and features a fairly breathable mesh foam back panel. The back is flexibly stiff, if that makes any sense. It stays relatively straight when I pack it with my layers and bends when I need it to when I’m stuffing it into another bag. #baglady The side mesh panels fit both my 32oz Nalgene bottles pretty snug and you can use the clips on the sides to clip the loop so that it doesn’t fall out as you bend over to look at a weird looking plant. That’s a pro-tip right now.

The side mesh panels fit both my 32oz Nalgene bottles pretty snug and you can use the clips on the sides to clip the loop so that it doesn’t completely fall out as you bend over to look at a weird looking plant. Now that’s a pro-tip.

There are two places you can load your gear. The main panel that fits your bigger items and a front pocket for your smaller stuff, like a first aid kit, snacks, keys, whatever. You can also stick a water sack (like a CamelBack) in the interior sleeve. I’ve never used it because, tbh, I think the straw part of the CamelBacks are disgusting and prone to mold 😛

There are two straps: the adjustable sternum strap (with a built-in whistle!!!) to keep your back straight (I guess?) and an adjustable hipbelt to keep it extra tight.

jenk-food-osprey-waist-belt-2

Fun fact: apparently you can clip this thing on to other Osprey packs. WHOAAA. One day, I’ll be able to afford another Osprey bag.

Oh, and Boyfran has a matching blue one (the one in most of the photos). We’re quite the little duo when we’re hiking out in the wild.

Lake 22, Washington; Photo Credit: Young Hong

If you’re an REI member, use your 20% off deal on any full-priced item (until April 10th), PLUS your dividends, so you can get this thing virtually for free. Make haste and make me proud. Buy a useful bag.

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